Definitions for eyespotˈaɪˌspɒt

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word eyespot

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

eye•spotˈaɪˌspɒt(n.)

  1. a light-sensitive group of cells or rudimentary visual structure of various algae and invertebrates.

    Category: Zoology

  2. Category: Ornithology

    Ref: eye (def. 16). 16

Princeton's WordNet

  1. eyespot, ocellus(noun)

    an eyelike marking (as on the wings of some butterflies); usually a spot of color inside a ring of another color

Wiktionary

  1. eyespot(Noun)

    Any of various primitive light-sensitive organs or regions in many diverse organisms.

  2. eyespot(Noun)

    An eye-like marking on the tail of a peacock or the wing of a butterfly.

  3. eyespot(Noun)

    Any of a group of fungal infections of grasses that are characterized by oval spots.

Freebase

  1. Eyespot

    An eyespot is an eye-like marking. They are found on butterflies, reptiles, felids, birds and fish. Eyespots may be a form of mimicry in which a spot on the body of an animal resembles an eye of a different animal to deceive potential predator or prey species; to draw a predator's attention away from the most vulnerable body parts; or to appear as an inedible or even dangerous animal. In larger animals, eyespots may play a role in intraspecies communication or courtship – the most well-known example is probably the eyespots on a peacock's display feathers. The eye-like markings in some butterflies and moths and certain other insects, as well as the Sunbittern do not seem to serve a mimicry function. In some other cases, the evolutionary function of such spots is also not understood. There is evidence that eyespots in butterflies are antipredator adaptations, either in deimatic displays to startle or scaring off predators, or to deflect attacks away from vital body parts. Butterfly eyespots may also play a role in mate recognition and sexual selection, playing a similar role to the eyespots found on larger organisms mentioned above. Pattern formation of concentric spots is probably less complex than the conspicuous eyespots might suggest; eyespots may simply be morphogenetic "spandrels", not necessarily adaptations.

CrunchBase

  1. EyeSpot

    Eyespot provides video editing and sharing software that can be easily embedded in any website. It includes video sharing technology, enabling users to share not only via email and embed codes but also to mobile phones, portable players, and other connected devices.Eyespot content screening technology employs audio, video, and text filtering techniques to protect website publishers against copyright infrle content in order to protect brands while optimizing visibility. Eyespot’s ad insertion and product placement technologies complete our turn-key solution. By providing contextual advertisements as an information service rather than as intrusive annoyances, the Eyespot platform brings audiences together with advertisers and content owners.

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