Definitions for etruscanɪˈtrʌs kən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word etruscan

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

E•trus•canɪˈtrʌs kən(n.)

  1. a member of a people inhabiting ancient Etruria, whose civilization flourished c700–400 b.c. : subsequently dominated and absorbed by the Romans.

    Category: Peoples, Ancient History

  2. the extinct language of the Etruscans.

    Category: Peoples

  3. (adj.)of or pertaining to Etruria, the Etruscans, or their language.

    Category: Peoples

    Ref: Abbr.: Etr.

Origin of Etruscan:

1700–10; < L Etrusc(us) of Etruria + -an1

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Etruscan(noun)

    a native or inhabitant of ancient Etruria; the Etruscans influenced the Romans (who had suppressed them by about 200 BC)

Wiktionary

  1. Etruscan(Noun)

    An inhabitant of ancient Etruria.

  2. Etruscan(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to the region and culture of Etruria, a pre-Roman civilization in Italy.

  3. Etruscan(ProperNoun)

    The extinct language of Etruria, which has no known relation to any other language.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Etruscan(noun)

    of or relating to Etruria

  2. Etruscan(noun)

    a native or inhabitant of Etruria

Freebase

  1. Etruscan language

    The Etruscan language was the spoken and written language of the Etruscan civilization, in Italy, in the ancient region of Etruria and in parts of Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna. Etruscan influenced Latin, but was eventually completely superseded by it. Although it left only a few significant documents, and a few dozen loanwords, such as the name Roma, its influence was significant. Attested from 700 BC to AD 50, the language has historically been referred to as an isolate, but consensus now holds that it is one of the Tyrsenian languages, along with the Raetic language of the Alps and the Lemnian language of the Aegean island of Lemnos. Lacking large corpora or extended texts, more distant relations of that family are unclear. A connection to the Anatolian languages, or at a further remove to Proto-Indo-European, has been suggested, while Russian scholars have suggested a link to the highly speculative Dené–Caucasian macrophylum, which itself is not widely credited. Grammatically, the language is agglutinating, with nouns and verbs showing suffixed inflectional endings and ablaut in some cases.

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"etruscan." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 20 Aug. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/etruscan>.

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