Definitions for ethɛð

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word eth

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

ethɛð(n.)

or edh

  1. a letter in the form of a crossed d, written đ or ð, used in Old English writing to represent both voiced and unvoiced th and in modern Icelandic and in phonetic alphabets to represent voiced

    th.

    Category: Phonetics, Language/Linguistics

-eth

  1. Ref: ,

  2. an ending of the third person singular present indicative of verbs, now occurring only in archaic forms or used in solemn or poetic language:

    hopeth; sitteth.

    Category: Affix

Origin of -eth:

OE -eth, -ath, -oth, -th; akin to L -t

-eth

  1. twentieth; thirtieth.

    Category: Affix

    Ref: var. of -th2, 3 2 the ordinal suffix, used when the cardinal number ends in -y

Eth.

  1. Ethiopia.

    Category: Geography (places)

Wiktionary

  1. eth(Noun)

    A letter (capital u00D0, small u00F0) introduced into Old English to represent its dental fricative, then not distinguished from the letter thorn, no longer used in English but still in modern use in Icelandic, Faroese, and phonetics to represent the voiced dental fricative "th" sound as in the English word then.

  2. Eth(ProperNoun)

    A short form of the female given name Ethel.

  3. Origin: The sound followed by the sound of the letter, by analogy with other letter names, such as those of f, l, and m.

Freebase

  1. Eth

    Eth is a letter used in Old English, Middle English, Icelandic, Faroese, and Elfdalian. It was also used in Scandinavia during the Middle Ages, but was subsequently replaced with dh and later d. It is transliterated to ed. Its use has survived in Iceland and the Faroe Islands. The capital eth resembles a D with a line through the vertical stroke. The lower case resembles an insular d with a line through the top. The lower-case letter has been adopted to represent a voiced dental fricative in the IPA. The letter originated in Irish writing as a d with a cross-stroke added. The lowercase version has retained the curved shape of a medieval scribe's d, which d itself in general has not. In Icelandic, ð represents a voiced dental fricative like th in English "them", but it never appears as the first letter of a word. The name of the letter is pronounced; i.e., voiceless, unless followed by a vowel. It has also been labeled an "interdental fricative". In Faroese, ð is not assigned to any particular phoneme and appears mostly for etymological reasons; however, it does show where most of the Faroese glides are, and when the ð is before r it is, in a few words, pronounced. In the Icelandic and Faroese alphabets, ð follows d.

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