Definitions for ecological succession

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word ecological succession

Princeton's WordNet

  1. succession, ecological succession(noun)

    (ecology) the gradual and orderly process of change in an ecosystem brought about by the progressive replacement of one community by another until a stable climax is established

Freebase

  1. Ecological succession

    Ecological succession is the observed process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time. The community begins with relatively few pioneering plants and animals and develops through increasing complexity until it becomes stable or self-perpetuating as a climax community. It is a phenomenon or process by which an ecological community undergoes more or less orderly and predictable changes following disturbance or initial colonization of new habitat. Succession may be initiated either by formation of new, unoccupied habitat or by some form of disturbance of an existing community. Succession that begins in new habitats, uninfluenced by pre-existing communities is called primary succession, whereas succession that follows disruption of a pre-existing community is called secondary succession. Succession was among the first theories advanced in ecology and the study of succession remains at the core of ecological science. Ecological succession was first documented in the Indiana Dunes of Northwest Indiana which led to efforts to preserve the Indiana Dunes. Exhibits on ecological succession are displayed in the Hour Glass, a museum in Ogden Dunes.

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"ecological succession." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 25 Nov. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/ecological succession>.

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