Definitions for ecclesiastesɪˌkli ziˈæs tiz

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word ecclesiastes

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Ec•cle•si•as•tesɪˌkli ziˈæs tiz(n.)

  1. a book of the Bible, containing thoughts about life and its meaning.

    Category: Bible

Origin of Ecclesiastes:

< LL < Gk ekklēsiastḗs person addressing an assembly, der. of ekklēsí(a)ecclesia

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Ecclesiastes, Book of Ecclesiastes(noun)

    an Old Testament book consisting of reflections on the vanity of human life; is traditionally attributed to Solomon but probably was written about 250 BC

Wiktionary

  1. Ecclesiastes(ProperNoun)

    A book in the Old Testament of the Bible. Sometimes abbreviated as Eccl. or Eccles.

  2. Origin: Latin Ecclesiastes, from Ancient Greek according Septuaginta Ἐκκλησιαστής

Webster Dictionary

  1. Ecclesiastes(adj)

    one of the canonical books of the Old Testament

Freebase

  1. Ecclesiastes

    Ecclesiastes, is a book of the Jewish Ketuvim and of the Old Testament. The title is a Latin transliteration of the Greek translation of the Hebrew Koheleth, meaning "Gatherer", but traditionally translated as "Teacher" or "Preacher". Koheleth introduces himself as "son of David, king in Jerusalem," perhaps implying that he is Solomon, but the work is in fact anonymous and was most probably composed in the last part of the 3rd century BC. The book is in the form of an autobiography telling of his investigation of the meaning of life and the best way of life. He proclaims all the actions of man to be inherently hevel, a word meaning "vain", "futile", "empty", "meaningless", "temporary", "transitory", "fleeting," or "mere breath," as the lives of both wise and foolish men end in death. While Koheleth clearly endorses wisdom as a means for a well-lived earthly life, he is unable to ascribe eternal meaning to it. In light of this perceived senselessness, he suggests that one should enjoy the simple pleasures of daily life, such as eating, drinking, and taking enjoyment in one's work, which are gifts from the hand of God. The book concludes with an injunction to "Fear God, and keep his commandments; for that is the whole duty of everyone".

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Ecclesiastes

    a book of the Old Testament, questionably ascribed to Solomon, and now deemed of more recent date as belonging to a period when the reflective spirit prevailed; and it is written apparently in depreciation of mere reflection as a stepping-stone to wisdom. The standpoint of the author is a religious one; the data on which he rests is given in experience, and his object is to expose the vanity of every source of satisfaction which is not founded on the fear, and has not supreme regard for the commandments, of God, a doctrine which is the very ground-principle of the Jewish faith; but if vanity is written over the whole field of human experience, he argues, this is not the fault of the system of things, but due, according to the author, to the folly of man (chap. vii. 29).


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