Definitions for dunbarˈdʌn bɑr for 1 ; dʌnˈbɑr for 2, 3

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word dunbar

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Dun•barˈdʌn bɑr for 1 ; dʌnˈbɑr for 2, 3(n.)

  1. Paul Laurence, 1872–1906, U.S. poet.

    Category: Biography

  2. William, c1460–c1520, Scottish poet.

    Category: Biography

  3. a town in the Lothian region, in SE Scotland, at the mouth of the Firth of Forth: site of Cromwell's defeat of the Scots 1650. 4586.

    Category: Geography (places), Western History

Wiktionary

  1. Dunbar(ProperNoun)

    A town in East Lothian, Scotland.

    1965 uE000169759uE001 In reply he sent Wilfrid to his town of Dunbar under the supervision of a sheriff called Tydlin whom he knew to be more cruel. uE000169760uE001 Eddius Stephanus, Life of Wilfrid, Page 107, 12 century. Translated from Latin by J. F. Webb.

  2. Origin: dun + bar or possibly from the name Bar or Barr, a follower of Kenneth, a captain of the Scots.

Freebase

  1. Dunbar

    Dunbar is a town in East Lothian on the southeast coast of Scotland, approximately 28 miles east of Edinburgh and 28 miles from the English Border at Berwick-upon-Tweed. Dunbar is a former Royal Burgh and gave its name to an ecclesiastical and civil parish. The parish extends around 7½ miles east to west and is 3½ miles deep at greatest extent or 11¼ square miles and contains the villages of West Barns, Belhaven, East Barns and several hamlets and farms. Its strategic position gave rise to a history full of incident and strife but Dunbar has become a quiet dormitory town popular with workers in nearby Edinburgh, who find it an affordable alternative to the capital itself. Until the 1960s the population of the town was little more than 3,500. The town is served by Dunbar railway station. Dunbar is home to the Dunbar Lifeboat Station, the second oldest RNLI station in Scotland.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Dunbar

    an ancient seaport and town of Haddingtonshire, on the coast of the Forth, 29 m. E. of Edinburgh; is a fishing station, and manufactures agricultural implements and paper; was, with its castle, which has stood many a siege, a place of importance in early Scottish history; near it Cromwell beat the Scots under Leslie on September 3, 1650.

  2. Dunbar

    William, a Scottish poet, entered the Franciscan order and became an itinerant preaching friar, in which capacity he wandered over the length and breadth of the land, enjoying good cheer by the way; was some time in the service of James IV., and wrote a poem, his most famous piece, entitled "The Thistle and the Rose," on the occasion of the King's marriage with the Princess Margaret Tudor, daughter of Henry VII. His poems were of three classes—allegoric, moral, and comic, the most remarkable being "The Dance," in which he describes the procession of the seven deadly sins in the infernal regions. Scott says he "was a poet unrivalled by any that Scotland has produced" (1480-1520).

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