Definitions for distrustdɪsˈtrʌst

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word distrust

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

dis•trust*dɪsˈtrʌst(v.t.)

  1. to regard with doubt or suspicion; have no trust in.

  2. (n.)lack of trust; doubt; suspicion.

* Syn: See suspicion.

Origin of distrust:

1505–15

dis•trust′er(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. misgiving, mistrust, distrust, suspicion(noun)

    doubt about someone's honesty

  2. distrust, distrustfulness, mistrust(verb)

    the trait of not trusting others

  3. distrust, mistrust, suspect(verb)

    regard as untrustworthy; regard with suspicion; have no faith or confidence in

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. distrust(noun)ɪsˈtrʌst

    suspicion or doubt

    a growing distrust of the management's motives

Wiktionary

  1. distrust(Noun)

    Lack of trust or confidence.

  2. distrust(Verb)

    To put no trust in; to have no confidence in.

  3. Origin: From dis- + trust

Webster Dictionary

  1. Distrust(verb)

    to feel absence of trust in; not to confide in or rely upon; to deem of questionable sufficiency or reality; to doubt; to be suspicious of; to mistrust

  2. Distrust(noun)

    doubt of sufficiency, reality, or sincerity; want of confidence, faith, or reliance; as, distrust of one's power, authority, will, purposes, schemes, etc

  3. Distrust(noun)

    suspicion of evil designs

  4. Distrust(noun)

    state of being suspected; loss of trust

Freebase

  1. Distrust

    Distrust is a formal way of not trusting any one party too much in a situation of grave risk or deep doubt. It is commonly expressed in civics as a division or balance of powers, or in politics as means of validating treaty terms. Systems based on distrust simply divide the responsibility so that checks and balances can operate. The phrase "Trust, but verify" refers specifically to distrust. An electoral system or adversarial process inevitably is based on distrust, but not on mistrust. Parties compete in the system, but they do not compete to subvert the system itself, or gain bad faith advantage through it - if they do they are easily caught by the others. Of course much mistrust does exist between parties, and it is exactly this which motivates putting in place a formal system of distrust. Diplomatic protocol for instance, which applies between states, relies on such means as formal disapproval which in effect say "we do not trust that person". It also tends to rely on a strict etiquette - distrusting each person's habits to signal their intent, and instead relying on a global standard for behaviour in sensitive social settings. A protocol as defined in computer science uses a more formal idea of distrust itself. Different parts of a system are not supposed to "trust" each other but rather perform specific assertions, requests and validations. Once these are passed, the responsibility for errors lies strictly with the receiving part of the system, not that which sent the original information. Applying this principle inside one program is called contract-based design.


Translations for distrust

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

distrust(noun)

suspicion; lack of trust or faith

He has always had a distrust of electrical gadgets.

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