Definitions for digressiondɪˈgrɛʃ ən, daɪ-

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word digression

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

di•gres•siondɪˈgrɛʃ ən, daɪ-(n.)

  1. the act of digressing.

  2. a passage or section that deviates from the central theme in speech or writing.

Origin of digression:

1325–75; < AF < L

di•gres′sion•al(adj.)

di•gres′sion•ar′y(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. digression, aside, excursus, divagation, parenthesis(noun)

    a message that departs from the main subject

  2. diversion, deviation, digression, deflection, deflexion, divagation(noun)

    a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)

    "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"

  3. digression, excursion(noun)

    wandering from the main path of a journey

Wiktionary

  1. digression(Noun)

    A departure from the subject, course, or idea at hand; an exploration of a different or unrelated concern.

    The lectures included lengthy digressions on topics ranging from the professor's dog to the meaning of life.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Digression(noun)

    the act of digressing or deviating, esp. from the main subject of a discourse; hence, a part of a discourse deviating from its main design or subject

  2. Digression(noun)

    a turning aside from the right path; transgression; offense

  3. Digression(noun)

    the elongation, or angular distance from the sun; -- said chiefly of the inferior planets

Freebase

  1. Digression

    Digression is a section of a composition or speech that is an intentional change of subject. In Classical rhetoric since Corax of Syracuse, especially in Institutio Oratoria of Quintilian, the digression was a regular part of any oration or composition.. After setting out the topic of a work and establishing the need for attention to be given, the speaker or author would digress to a seemingly disconnected subject before returning to a development of the composition's theme, a proof of its validity, and a conclusion. This use of the digression is still noticeable in many sermons: after the topic, the speaker will introduce a "story" that seems to be unrelated, return to the subject, and then reveal how the story illustrates the speaker's point. A schizothemia is a digression by means of a long reminiscence. Cicero was a master of digression, particularly in his ability to shift from the specific question or issue at hand to the more general issue or question that it depended upon. As was the case with most ancient orators, Cicero's apparent digression always turned out to bear directly upon the issue at hand. During the Second Sophist, the ability to guide a speech away from a stated theme and then back again with grace and skill came to be a mark of true eloquence.


Translations for digression

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

Get even more translations for digression »

Translation

Find a translation for the digression definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these digression definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"digression." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 28 Jul 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/digression>.

Are we missing a good definition for digression?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for digression: