Definitions for daemonˈdi mən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word daemon

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

dae•monˈdi mən(n.)

  1. Category: Mythology

    Ref: daimon .

  2. Category: Mythology

    Ref: demon (def. 1). 1 1

dae•mon•icdɪˈmɒn ɪk(adj.)dae`mon•is′tic

Princeton's WordNet

  1. devil, fiend, demon, daemon, daimon(noun)

    an evil supernatural being

  2. daemon, demigod(noun)

    a person who is part mortal and part god

Webster Dictionary

  1. Daemon(adj)

    alt. of Daemonic

Freebase

  1. Daemon

    In multitasking computer operating systems, a daemon is a computer program that runs as a background process, rather than being under the direct control of an interactive user. Traditionally daemon names end with the letter d: for example, syslogd is the daemon that implements the system logging facility and sshd is a daemon that services incoming SSH connections. In a Unix environment, the parent process of a daemon is often, but not always, the init process. A daemon is usually created by a process forking a child process and then immediately exiting, thus causing init to adopt the child process. In addition, a daemon or the operating system typically must perform other operations, such as dissociating the process from any controlling terminal. Such procedures are often implemented in various convenience routines such as daemon in Unix. Systems often start daemons at boot time and serve the function of responding to network requests, hardware activity, or other programs by performing some task. Daemons can also configure hardware, run scheduled tasks, and perform a variety of other tasks.

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. daemon

    [from Maxwell's Demon, later incorrectly retronymed as ‘Disk And Execution MONitor’] A program that is not invoked explicitly, but lies dormant waiting for some condition(s) to occur. The idea is that the perpetrator of the condition need not be aware that a daemon is lurking (though often a program will commit an action only because it knows that it will implicitly invoke a daemon). For example, under ITS, writing a file on the LPT spooler's directory would invoke the spooling daemon, which would then print the file. The advantage is that programs wanting (in this example) files printed need neither compete for access to nor understand any idiosyncrasies of the LPT. They simply enter their implicit requests and let the daemon decide what to do with them. Daemons are usually spawned automatically by the system, and may either live forever or be regenerated at intervals.Daemon and demon are often used interchangeably, but seem to have distinct connotations. The term daemon was introduced to computing by CTSS people (who pronounced it /dee´mon/) and used it to refer to what ITS called a dragon; the prototype was a program called DAEMON that automatically made tape backups of the file system. Although the meaning and the pronunciation have drifted, we think this glossary reflects current (2003) usage.

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