Definitions for corollaryˈkɔr əˌlɛr i, ˈkɒr-; esp. Brit., kəˈrɒl ə ri

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word corollary

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

cor•ol•lar•yˈkɔr əˌlɛr i, ˈkɒr-; esp. Brit., kəˈrɒl ə ri(n.)(pl.)-lar•ies.

  1. Math. a proposition incidentally proved in proving another proposition.

    Category: Math

  2. an immediate consequence or easily drawn conclusion.

  3. a natural consequence or result.

Origin of corollary:

1325–75; < LL corollārium corollary, in L: money paid for a garland, gratuity. See corolla , -ary

Princeton's WordNet

  1. corollary(noun)

    a practical consequence that follows naturally

    "blind jealousy is a frequent corollary of passionate love"

  2. corollary(noun)

    (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition

Wiktionary

  1. corollary(Noun)

    Something given beyond what is actually due; something added or superfluous.

  2. corollary(Noun)

    Something which occurs a fortiori, as a result of another effort without significant additional effort.

    Finally getting that cracked window fixed was a nice corollary of redoing the whole storefont.

  3. corollary(Noun)

    A proposition which follows easily from the proof of another proposition.

    We have proven that this set is finite and well ordered; as a corollary, we now know that there is an order-preserving map from it to the natural numbers.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Corollary(noun)

    that which is given beyond what is actually due, as a garland of flowers in addition to wages; surplus; something added or superfluous

  2. Corollary(noun)

    something which follows from the demonstration of a proposition; an additional inference or deduction from a demonstrated proposition; a consequence

Freebase

  1. Corollary

    A corollary is a statement that follows readily from a previous statement. In mathematics a corollary typically follows a theorem. The use of the term corollary, rather than proposition or theorem, is intrinsically subjective. Proposition B is a corollary of proposition A if B can readily be deduced from A or is self-evident from its proof, but the meaning of readily or self-evident varies depending upon the author and context. The importance of the corollary is often considered secondary to that of the initial theorem; B is unlikely to be termed a corollary if its mathematical consequences are as significant as those of A. Sometimes a corollary has a proof that explains the derivation; sometimes the derivation is considered self-evident. It is also known as a bonus result.

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"corollary." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 25 Oct. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/corollary>.

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