Definitions for chartismˈtʃɑr tɪz əm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word chartism

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Chart•ismˈtʃɑr tɪz əm(n.)

  1. the principles or movement of a group of political and social reformers in England 1838–1848.

    Category: Western History

Origin of Chartism:

1839; after the People's Charter, embodying the movement's goals

Chart′ist(n.; adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Chartism(noun)

    the principles of a body of 19th century English reformers who advocated better social and economic conditions for working people

Wiktionary

  1. chartism(Noun)

    The practices and methodologies of chartists.

  2. Chartism(ProperNoun)

    A movement for political and social reform in the United Kingdom during the mid-19th century.

  3. Origin: Named after the People's Charter of 1838.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Chartism(noun)

    the principles of a political party in England (1838-48), which contended for universal suffrage, the vote by ballot, annual parliaments, equal electoral districts, and other radical reforms, as set forth in a document called the People's Charter

Freebase

  1. Chartism

    Chartism was a Victorian era working class movement for political reform in Britain between 1838 and 1848. It takes its name from the People's Charter of 1838. The term "Chartism" is the umbrella name for numerous loosely coordinated local groups, often named "Working Men's Association," articulating grievances in many cities from 1837. Its peak activity came in 1839, 1842 and 1848. It began among skilled artisans in small shops, such as shoemakers, printers, and tailors. The movement was more aggressive in areas with many distressed handloom workers, such as in Lancashire and the Midlands. It began as a petition movement which tried to mobilize "moral force", but soon attracted men who advocated strikes, General strikes and physical violence, such as Feargus O'Connor and known as "physical force" chartists. One faction issued the "People's Charter" in 1838 and it was widely adopted by the movement. The People's Charter called for six basic reforms to make the political system more democratic: ⁕A vote for every man over the age of 21; ⁕A secret ballot; ⁕No property qualification for members of Parliament; ⁕Payment for MPs; ⁕Constituencies of equal size; ⁕Annual elections for Parliament.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Chartism

    a movement of the working-classes of Great Britain for greater political power than was conceded to them by the Reform Bill of 1832, and which found expression in a document called the "People's Charter," drawn up in 1838, embracing six "points," as they were called, viz., Manhood Suffrage, Equal Electoral Districts, Vote by Ballot, Annual Parliaments, Abolition of a Property Qualification in the Parliamentary Representation, and Payment of Members of Parliament, all which took the form of a petition presented to the House of Commons in 1839, and signed by 1,380,000 persons. The refusal of the petition gave rise to great agitation over the country, which gradually died out in 1848.

Translation

Find a translation for the chartism definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these chartism definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"chartism." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 1 Oct. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/chartism>.

Are we missing a good definition for chartism?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for chartism: