Definitions for celluloseˈsɛl yəˌloʊs

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word cellulose

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

cel•lu•loseˈsɛl yəˌloʊs(n.)

  1. an inert carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, the chief constituent of the cell walls of plants and of wood, cotton, hemp, paper, etc.

    Category: Botany, Chemistry

Origin of cellulose:

1745–55; < NL cellul(a) live cell (see cellular ) + -ose2

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cellulose(noun)

    a polysaccharide that is the chief constituent of all plant tissues and fibers

Wiktionary

  1. cellulose(Noun)

    A complex carbohydrate that forms the main constituent of the cell wall in most plants and is important in the manufacture of numerous products, such as paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and explosives.

  2. cellulose(Noun)

    A polysaccharide containing many glucose units in parallel chains.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Cellulose(adj)

    consisting of, or containing, cells

  2. Cellulose(noun)

    the substance which constitutes the essential part of the solid framework of plants, of ordinary wood, linen, paper, etc. It is also found to a slight extent in certain animals, as the tunicates. It is a carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, isomeric with starch, and is convertible into starches and sugars by the action of heat and acids. When pure, it is a white amorphous mass. See Starch, Granulose, Lignin

Freebase

  1. Cellulose

    Cellulose is an organic compound with the formula n, a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to over ten thousand β linked D-glucose units. Cellulose is an important structural component of the primary cell wall of green plants, many forms of algae and the oomycetes. Some species of bacteria secrete it to form biofilms. Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on Earth. The cellulose content of cotton fiber is 90%, that of wood is 40–50% and that of dried hemp is approximately 45%. Cellulose is mainly used to produce paperboard and paper. Smaller quantities are converted into a wide variety of derivative products such as cellophane and rayon. Conversion of cellulose from energy crops into biofuels such as cellulosic ethanol is under investigation as an alternative fuel source. Cellulose for industrial use is mainly obtained from wood pulp and cotton. Some animals, particularly ruminants and termites, can digest cellulose with the help of symbiotic micro-organisms that live in their guts, such as Trichonympha. Humans can digest cellulose to some extent, however it mainly acts as a hydrophilic bulking agent for feces and is often referred to as "dietary fiber".

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Cellulose

    A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.


Translations for cellulose

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

cellulose(noun)

the chief substance in the cell walls of plants, also found in woods, used in the making of plastic, paper etc.

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