Definitions for cadmiumˈkæd mi əm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word cadmium

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

cad•mi•umˈkæd mi əm(n.)

  1. a white, ductile, divalent metallic element resembling tin, used in plating and in making certain alloys.

    Category: Chemistry

    Ref: Symbol: Cd; 2

Origin of cadmium:

< G Kadmium (1817) < L cadm(īa) zinc oxide

cad′mic(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cadmium, Cd, atomic number 48(noun)

    a soft bluish-white ductile malleable toxic bivalent metallic element; occurs in association with zinc ores

Wiktionary

  1. cadmium(Noun)

    a metallic chemical element (symbol Cd) with an atomic number of 48.

  2. Origin: from Greek Καδμεία (calamine), a Cadmium-bearing mixture of minerals, which was named after the god, Κάδμος (Cadmus)

Webster Dictionary

  1. Cadmium(noun)

    a comparatively rare element related to zinc, and occurring in some zinc ores. It is a white metal, both ductile and malleable. Symbol Cd. Atomic weight 111.8. It was discovered by Stromeyer in 1817, who named it from its association with zinc or zinc ore

Freebase

  1. Cadmium

    Cadmium is a chemical element with the symbol Cd and atomic number 48. This soft, bluish-white metal is chemically similar to the two other stable metals in group 12, zinc and mercury. Like zinc, it prefers oxidation state +2 in most of its compounds and like mercury it shows a low melting point compared to transition metals. Cadmium and its congeners are not always considered transition metals, in that they do not have partly filled d or f electron shells in the elemental or common oxidation states. The average concentration of cadmium in the Earth's crust is between 0.1 and 0.5 parts per million. It was discovered in 1817 simultaneously by Stromeyer and Hermann, both in Germany, as an impurity in zinc carbonate. Cadmium occurs as a minor component in most zinc ores and therefore is a byproduct of zinc production. It was used for a long time as a pigment and for corrosion resistant plating on steel while cadmium compounds were used to stabilize plastic. With the exception of its use in nickel–cadmium batteries and cadmium telluride solar panels, the use of cadmium is generally decreasing. These declines have been due to competing technologies, cadmium’s toxicity in certain forms and concentration and resulting regulations. Although cadmium has no known biological function in higher organisms, a cadmium-dependent carbonic anhydrase has been found in marine diatoms.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Cadmium

    An element with atomic symbol Cd, atomic number 48, and atomic weight 114. It is a metal and ingestion will lead to CADMIUM POISONING.

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