Definitions for broadbandˈbrɔdˌbænd

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word broadband

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

broad•bandˈbrɔdˌbænd(adj.)

  1. of, pertaining to, or responsive to a continuous, wide range of electromagnetic-wave frequencies.

    Category: Telegraphy and Telephony

  2. pertaining to or being a type of high-speed data transmission in which the bandwidth is shared by more than one simultaneous signal.

    Category: Telegraphy and Telephony

  3. (n.)broadband transmission.

    Category: Telegraphy and Telephony

Origin of broadband:

1900–05

Princeton's WordNet

  1. broadband(adj)

    of or relating to or being a communications network in which the bandwidth can be divided and shared by multiple simultaneous signals (as for voice or data or video)

  2. broadband, wideband(adj)

    responding to or operating at a wide band of frequencies

    "a broadband antenna"

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. broadband(noun)ˈbrɔdˌbænd

    a fast connection between the computer and the Internet

Wiktionary

  1. broadband(Noun)

    A wide band of electromagnetic frequencies

  2. broadband(Noun)

    An internet connection with a much larger capacity than dial-up or ISDN.

  3. broadband(Adjective)

    Of, pertaining to, or carrying a wide band of electromagnetic frequencies

Freebase

  1. Broadband

    The term broadband refers to the wide bandwidth characteristics of a transmission medium and its ability to transport multiple signals and traffic types simultaneously. The medium can be coax, optical fiber, twisted pair or wireless. In contrast, baseband describes a communication system in which information is transported across a single channel. Prior to the invention of home broadband, dial-up Internet access was the only means by which one could access the Internet and download files such as songs, movies, e-mails, etc. It would take anywhere from 10–30 minutes to download one song and over 28 hours to download a movie. Dial-up Internet was also considered very inconvenient as it would impair the use of the home telephone line, and users would contemplate whether or not to get a second line, and if doing so was worth the cost. In 1997, the cable modem was introduced, although the common use of broadband didn't begin rising until 2001. Having a broadband connection enabled one to download significantly faster than on dial-up. As with many new technologies, most consumers were unable to afford the cost of faster Internet service. However, high costs weren't a factor for long as by 2004, most average American households considered home broadband service to be affordable. Since its inception, broadband has continually strengthened and available connection speeds continue to rise.

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