Definitions for bedrockˈbɛdˌrɒk

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word bedrock

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

bed•rockˈbɛdˌrɒk(n.)

  1. unbroken solid rock, overlaid in most places by soil or rock fragments.

    Category: Geology

  2. the bottom layer.

  3. any firm foundation.

  4. the fundamental principles, as of a science.

Origin of bedrock:

1840–50, Amer.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. bedrock(noun)

    solid unweathered rock lying beneath surface deposits of soil

  2. fundamentals, basics, fundamental principle, basic principle, bedrock(noun)

    principles from which other truths can be derived

    "first you must learn the fundamentals"; "let's get down to basics"

Wiktionary

  1. bedrock(Noun)

    The solid rock that exists at some depth below the ground surface. Bedrock is rock "in place", as opposed to material that has been transported from another location by weathering and erosion.

  2. bedrock(Noun)

    A basis or foundation.

  3. Bedrock(ProperNoun)

    Name of the fictional town in

Freebase

  1. Bedrock

    In stratigraphy, bedrock is the common term for consolidated rock underlying the surface of a terrestrial planet, usually the Earth. Above the bedrock is usually an area of broken and weathered unconsolidated rock in the basal subsoil. The top of the bedrock is known as rockhead and identifying this, via excavations, drilling or geophysical methods, is an important task in most civil engineering projects. Superficial deposits can be extremely thick, such that the bedrock lies hundreds of meters below the surface. Bedrock may also experience subsurface weathering at its upper boundary, forming saprolite. A solid geologic map of an area will usually show the distribution of differing rock types; i.e., rock that would be exposed at the surface if all soil or other superficial deposits were removed. Soil scientists use the capital letters O, A, B, C, and E to identify the master soil horizons, and lowercase letters for distinctions of these horizons. Most soils have three major horizons—the surface horizon, the subsoil, and the substratum. Some soils have an organic horizon on the surface, but this horizon can also be buried. The master horizon, E, is used for subsurface horizons that have a significant loss of minerals. Hard bedrock, which is not soil, uses the letter R.

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