Definitions for alliterationəˌlɪt əˈreɪ ʃən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word alliteration

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

al•lit•er•a•tionəˌlɪt əˈreɪ ʃən(n.)

  1. repetition of the same sound, as a consonant or cluster, at the beginning of two or more stressed syllables, as in from stem to stern.

    Category: Prosody

    Ref: Compare consonance (def. 4a). 4 1

  2. the commencement of two or more words of a word group with the same letter, as in

    apt alliteration's artful aid.

    Category: Prosody

Origin of alliteration:

1650–60; < ML alliterātiō=al-al - +literātiō

al•lit′er•a`tive•ness(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. alliteration, initial rhyme, beginning rhyme, head rhyme(noun)

    use of the same consonant at the beginning of each stressed syllable in a line of verse

    "around the rock the ragged rascal ran"

Wiktionary

  1. alliteration(Noun)

    The repetition of consonants at the beginning of two or more words immediately succeeding each other, or at short intervals.

  2. alliteration(Noun)

    The recurrence of the same letter in accented parts of words, as in Anglo-Saxon alliterative meter.

  3. Origin: From ad and litera.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Alliteration(noun)

    the repetition of the same letter at the beginning of two or more words immediately succeeding each other, or at short intervals; as in the following lines: -

Freebase

  1. Alliteration

    In language, 'alliteration' is the repetition of a particular sound in the prominent lifts of a series of words or phrases. Alliteration has developed largely through poetry, in which it more narrowly refers to the repetition of a consonant in any syllables that, according to the poem's meter, are stressed, as in James Thomson's verse "Come…dragging the lazy languid Line along". Another example is Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers. In alliterative verse, the alliteration that is relevant to the metre is the lift of the half-line; the ironic example often given to illustrate this is that the word alliteration itself alliterates on the consonant l, not a - thus, bold beauty is an alliterative formula, between beauties is not, etc. Consonance is another 'phonetic agreement' akin to alliteration. Assonance is also often in said category, though is more akin to true-rhyme than alliteration. Alliteration may also include the use of different consonants with similar properties such as alliterating z with s, as does Tolkien in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, or as Anglo-Saxon poets would alliterate hard/fricative g with soft g; this is known as license. The concept is that the sounds are formed orally with exceptional similarity.

Translation

Find a translation for the alliteration definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these alliteration definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"alliteration." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 30 Sep. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/alliteration>.

Are we missing a good definition for alliteration?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for alliteration: