Definitions for acadianəˈkeɪ di ən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word acadian

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

A•ca•di•anəˈkeɪ di ən(n.)

  1. a native or inhabitant of Acadia.

    Category: Peoples

  2. any of the French-speaking inhabitants of Acadia expelled by the British 1755–63, and their descendants, esp. in the Maritime Provinces, N Maine, and Louisiana.

  3. (adj.)of or pertaining to Acadia.

    Category: Peoples

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Acadian(noun)

    an early French settler in the Maritimes

Wiktionary

  1. Acadian(Noun)

    A native of Acadia.

  2. Acadian(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to Acadia, its people, or their language or culture.

  3. Acadian(Adjective)

    Of or pertaining to the Acadian epoch.

  4. Acadian(ProperNoun)

    Acadian French: the form of French spoken in Acadia.

    In many places, Acadian has been supplanted by English and by Standard French.

  5. Acadian(ProperNoun)

    Acadian epoch: the Middle Cambrian.

    The Burgess Shale contains fossils of very odd organisms that lived during the Acadian.

  6. Origin: * First attested in 1705.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Acadian(adj)

    of or pertaining to Acadie, or Nova Scotia

  2. Acadian(noun)

    a native of Acadie

Freebase

  1. Acadians

    The Acadians are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia, many of whom are metis. The colony was located in what is now Eastern Canada's Maritime provinces, as well as part of Quebec, and present-day Maine to the Kennebec River. Although today most of the Acadians and Québécois are French speaking Canadians, Acadia was a distinctly separate colony of New France. It was geographically and administratively separate from the French colony of Canada. As a result, the Acadians and Québécois developed two distinct histories and cultures. They also developed a slightly different French language. France has one official language and to accomplish this they have an administration in charge of the language. Since the Acadians were separated from this council, their French language did not evolve, and Acadians continue to speak a 17th-century French. The settlers whose descendants became Acadians came from "all the regions of France but coming predominantly directly from the cities". Prior to the British Conquest of Acadia in 1710, the Acadians lived for almost 80 years in Acadia. After the Conquest, they lived under British rule for the next forty-five years. During the French and Indian War, British colonial officers suspected their loyalty. The British, together with New England legislators and militia, carried out the Great Expulsion of 1755–1763 during the war years. They deported approximately 11,500 Acadians from the maritime region. Approximately one-third perished from disease and drowning. Although one historian compared this event to contemporary ethnic cleansing, other historians suggested that the event is comparable with other deportations in history.

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