Definitions for acaciaəˈkeɪ ʃə

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word acacia

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

a•ca•ciaəˈkeɪ ʃə(n.)(pl.)-cias.

  1. a small tree or shrub of the genus Acacia, of the legume family, having clusters of small yellow flowers.

    Category: Plants

  2. any of several other plants, as the locust tree.

    Category: Plants

  3. Ref: gum arabic.

Origin of acacia:

1535–45; < L < Gk akakía Egyptian thorn

Princeton's WordNet

  1. acacia(noun)

    any of various spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Acacia

Webster Dictionary

  1. Acacia(noun)

    a roll or bag, filled with dust, borne by Byzantine emperors, as a memento of mortality. It is represented on medals

  2. Acacia(noun)

    a genus of leguminous trees and shrubs. Nearly 300 species are Australian or Polynesian, and have terete or vertically compressed leaf stalks, instead of the bipinnate leaves of the much fewer species of America, Africa, etc. Very few are found in temperate climates

  3. Acacia(noun)

    the inspissated juice of several species of acacia; -- called also gum acacia, and gum arabic

Freebase

  1. Acacia

    Acacia, also known as a thorntree, whistling thorn or wattle, is a genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the family Fabaceae, described by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1773 based on the African species Acacia nilotica. Many non-Australian species tend to be thorny, whereas the majority of Australian acacias are not. All species are pod-bearing, with sap and leaves often bearing large amounts of tannins and condensed tannins that historically found use as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. The generic name derives from ἀκακία, the name given by early Greek botanist-physician Pedanius Dioscorides to the medicinal tree A. nilotica in his book Materia Medica. This name derives from the Greek word for its characteristic thorns, ἀκίς. The species name nilotica was given by Linnaeus from this tree's best-known range along the Nile river. The genus Acacia previously contained roughly 1300 species, about 960 of them native to Australia, with the remainder spread around the tropical to warm-temperate regions of both hemispheres, including Europe, Africa, southern Asia, and the Americas. However, in 2005 the genus was divided into five separate genera under the tribe "Acacieae." The genus Acacia was retained for the majority of the Australian species and a few in tropical Asia, Madagascar and Pacific Islands. Most of the species outside Australia, and a small number of Australian species, were reclassified into Vachellia and Senegalia. The two final genera, Acaciella and Mariosousa, each contain about a dozen species from the Americas.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Acacia

    a large group of trees with astringent and gum-yielding properties, natives of tropical Africa and Australia.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Acacia

    A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. The gums and tanning agents obtained from Acacia are called GUM ARABIC. The common name of catechu is more often used for Areca catechu (ARECA).

CrunchBase

  1. Acacia

    Acacia is a mobile app company that challenges its users to live life. The company has a different agenda than most app companies. Instead of keeping the users focus on the screen, Acacia challenges its users to use the screen to help them focus on what’s outside of it. Friends, family, adventures, fun and living life.

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