Definitions for Yorkyɔrk

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word York

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Yorkyɔrk(n.)

  1. a member of the royal house of England that ruled from 1461 to 1485.

    Category: Western History

  2. 1st Duke of (Edmund of Langley), 1341–1402, progenitor of the house of York (son of Edward III).

    Category: Biography

  3. Alvin Cullum (Sergeant), 1887–1964, U.S. soldier.

    Category: Biography

  4. Category: Geography (places)

    Ref: Yorkshire (def. 1). 1

  5. Category: Geography (places)

    Ref: Ancient, Eboracum.

  6. a city in SE Pennsylvania: meeting of the Continental Congress 1777–78. 44,619.

    Category: Geography (places)

  7. an estuary in E Virginia, flowing SE into Chesapeake Bay. 40 mi. (64 km) long.

    Category: Geography (places)

  8. Cape, a cape at the NE extremity of Australia.

    Category: Geography (places)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. York, House of York(noun)

    the English royal house (a branch of the Plantagenet line) that reigned from 1461 to 1485; its emblem was a white rose

Wiktionary

  1. york(Verb)

    to bowl a yorker at a batsman, especially to get a batsman out in this way.

  2. York(ProperNoun)

    A city in North Yorkshire, England.

  3. York(ProperNoun)

    The House of York, a dynasty of English kings and one of the opposing factions involved in the 15th century Wars of the Roses. The name comes from the fact that its members were descended from Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York; their symbol was a white rose.

  4. York(ProperNoun)

    Former name (before 1834) of Toronto.

  5. York(ProperNoun)

    from the city or the county; See also Yorke.

  6. Origin: From Jórvík, from Eoforwic, from Eboracum, from Eborakon (compare Old Caer Ebrauc, mod. Efrog), from eburo 'yew; black alder' (compare efwr, evor).

Freebase

  1. York

    York is a walled city, situated at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city offers a wealth of historic attractions, of which York Minster is the most prominent, and a variety of cultural and sporting activities. The city was founded by the Romans in 71 AD, under the name of Eboracum. It became in turn the capital of the Roman province of Britannia Inferior, and of the kingdoms of Northumbria and Jorvik. In the Middle Ages, York grew as a major wool trading centre and became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England, a role it has retained. In the 19th century, York became a hub of the railway network and a confectionery manufacturing centre. In recent decades, the economy of York has moved from being dominated by its confectionery and railway-related industries to one that provides services. The University of York and health services have become major employers, whilst tourism has become an important element of the local economy. From 1996, the term City of York describes a unitary authority area which includes rural areas beyond the old city boundaries. In 2001 the urban area had a population of 137,505, while in 2010 the entire unitary authority had an estimated population of 202,400.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. York

    the county town of Yorkshire, situated at the confluence of the Foss with the Ouse, 188 m. N. of London and 22 m. NE. of Leeds; is an interesting historic town, the seat of an archbishop, and a great railway centre; known among the Romans as Eboracum, it was the centre of the Roman power in the North, relics of which as such still remain; its cathedral, known as the Minster, is one of the grandest in England; it is built on the site of a church erected as early as the 7th century, and was finished as it now exists in 1470; it is 524 ft. in length, and the transepts 250 ft., the breadth of the nave 140 ft., the height of the central tower 216 ft., and of the western one 201 ft. There are other buildings of great antiquity, and the Guildhall dates from the 15th century. It is the military head-quarters of the northern district of England.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'York' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1158

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'York' in Written Corpus Frequency: #566

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