Definitions for Time–space compression

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  1. Time–space compression

    Time–space compression, first articulated in 1989 by geographer David Harvey in The Condition of Postmodernity, refers to any phenomenon that alters the qualities of and relationship between space and time. Time–space compression often occurs as a result of technological innovations that condense or elide spatial and temporal distances, including technologies of communication, travel, and economics. According to theorists like Paul Virilio, time-space compression is an essential facet of contemporary life: "Today we are entering a space which is speed-space ... This new other time is that of electronic transmission, of high-tech machines, and therefore, man is present in this sort of time, not via his physical presence, but via programming". Virilio also uses the term dromology to describe "speed-space." Doreen Massey maintains this idea about time-space compression in her discussion of globalization and its effect on our society. Similar to Virilio, she states that because our world is "speeding up" and "spreading out", time-space compression is more prevalent than ever as internationalization takes place.

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