Definitions for Schemaˈski mə; ˈski mə tə or, sometimes, skiˈmɑ tə, skɪ-

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Schema

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

sche•maˈski mə; ˈski mə tə or, sometimes, skiˈmɑ tə, skɪ-(n.)(pl.)sche•ma•ta; sche•mas.

  1. a diagram, plan, or scheme.

  2. an underlying organizational pattern or structure; conceptual framework.

    Category: Language/Linguistics

Origin of schema:

1790–1800; < Gk schêma form, scheme

Princeton's WordNet

  1. schema, scheme(noun)

    an internal representation of the world; an organization of concepts and actions that can be revised by new information about the world

  2. outline, schema, scheme(noun)

    a schematic or preliminary plan

Wiktionary

  1. schema(Noun)

    An outline or image universally applicable to a general conception, under which it is likely to be presented to the mind.

  2. schema(Noun)

    A formal description of the structure of a database: the names of the tables, the names of the columns of each table, and the type and other attributes of each column. (And similarly for the descriptive information of other database-like structures, such as XML files.)

  3. schema(Noun)

    A formula in the language of an axiomatic system, in which one or more schematic variables appear, which stand for any term or subformula of the system, which may or may not be required to satisfy certain conditions.

  4. Origin: From schema, from .

Webster Dictionary

  1. Schema(noun)

    an outline or image universally applicable to a general conception, under which it is likely to be presented to the mind; as, five dots in a line are a schema of the number five; a preceding and succeeding event are a schema of cause and effect

Freebase

  1. Schema

    In psychology and cognitive science, a schema, describes an organized pattern of thought or behavior. It can also be described as a mental structure of preconceived ideas, a framework representing some aspect of the world, or a system of organizing and perceiving new information. Schemata influence attention and the absorption of new knowledge: people are more likely to notice things that fit into their schema, while re-interpreting contradictions to the schema as exceptions or distorting them to fit. Schemata have a tendency to remain unchanged, even in the face of contradictory information. Schemas can help in understanding the world. Most situations do not require effortful thought when using schema, since automatic thought is all that is required. People can organize new perceptions into schemas quickly. People use schemata to organize current knowledge and provide a framework for future understanding. Examples of schemata include academic rubrics, social schemas, stereotypes, social roles, scripts, worldviews, and archetypes. In Piaget's theory of development, children adopt a series of schemata to understand the world.


Translations for Schema

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

chart(noun)

a table or diagram giving information

a weather chart.

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