Definitions for Pharmacologyˌfɑr məˈkɒl ə dʒi

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Pharmacology

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

phar•ma•col•o•gyˌfɑr məˈkɒl ə dʒi(n.)

  1. the science dealing with the preparation, uses, and esp. the effects of drugs.

    Category: Pharmacology

Origin of pharmacology:

1715–25; < NL pharmacologia. See pharmaco -, -logy

phar`ma•col′o•gist(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. pharmacology, pharmacological medicine, materia medica(noun)

    the science or study of drugs: their preparation and properties and uses and effects

Wiktionary

  1. pharmacology(Noun)

    The science that studies the effects of chemical compounds on living animals, especially the science of the manufacture, use and effects of medicinal drugs.

  2. pharmacology(Noun)

    The medicinal characteristics of a specific drug.

  3. Origin: From pharmaco- + -logy.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Pharmacology(noun)

    knowledge of drugs or medicines; the art of preparing medicines

  2. Pharmacology(noun)

    a treatise on the art of preparing medicines

Freebase

  1. Pharmacology

    Pharmacology is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous molecule which exerts a biochemical and/or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism. More specifically, it is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, synthesis and drug design, molecular and cellular mechanisms, organ/systems mechanisms, signal transduction/cellular communication, molecular diagnostics, interactions, toxicology, chemical biology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities. The two main areas of pharmacology are pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. The former studies the effects of the drug on biological systems, and the latter the effects of biological systems on the drug. In broad terms, pharmacodynamics discusses the chemicals with biological receptors, and pharmacokinetics discusses the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of chemicals from the biological systems. Pharmacology is not synonymous with pharmacy and the two terms are frequently confused. Pharmacology, a biomedical science, deals with the research, discovery, and characterization of chemicals which show biological effects and the elucidation of cellular and organismal function in relation to these chemicals. In contrast, pharmacy, a health services profession, is concerned with application of the principles learned from pharmacology in its clinical settings; whether it be in a dispensing or clinical care role. In either field, the primary contrast between the two are their distinctions between direct-patient care, for pharmacy practice, and the science-oriented research field, driven by pharmacology.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Pharmacology

    The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.

Translation

Find a translation for the Pharmacology definition in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss these Pharmacology definitions with the community:


Citation

Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Pharmacology." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2014. Web. 22 Aug. 2014. <http://www.definitions.net/definition/Pharmacology>.

Are we missing a good definition for Pharmacology?


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network


Nearby & related entries:

Alternative searches for Pharmacology: