Definitions for KICKkɪk

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word KICK

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

kickkɪk(v.t.)

  1. to strike with the foot or feet:

    to kick a ball.

  2. to drive, force, thrust, etc., by or as if by kicks.

  3. Football. to score (a field goal or a conversion) by place-kicking the ball.

    Category: Sport

  4. Informal. to make (a car) increase in speed, esp. in auto racing.

    Category: Informal

  5. Slang. to give up or break (a drug addiction):

    He kicked the habit.

    Category: Common Vocabulary, Status (usage)

  6. (v.i.)to make a rapid, forceful thrust with the foot, feet, leg, or legs; strike with the feet or legs:

    to kick at a ball.

  7. to resist, object, or complain.

    Category: Informal

  8. to recoil, as a firearm when fired.

  9. to be actively or vigorously involved:

    alive and kicking.

  10. kick around orabout, to treat harshly. to speculate about; discuss. to move frequently from place to place; roam; wander. to linger or remain for a long interval without being used, noticed, or resolved.

    Category: Verb Phrase

  11. kick back, to recoil, esp. vigorously or unexpectedly. to give someone a kickback. to relax.

    Category: Informal, Verb Phrase

  12. kick in, to contribute one's share, esp. in money. to go into effect; become operational.

    Category: Informal, Verb Phrase

  13. kick off, Football. to begin or resume play by a kickoff. Slang. to die. to initiate (an undertaking).

    Category: Verb Phrase, Sport, Status (usage)

  14. kick on, to switch on; turn on.

    Category: Verb Phrase

  15. kick out, to eject; get rid of.

    Category: Verb Phrase, Informal

  16. kick over, (of an internal-combustion engine) to begin ignition; turn over.

    Category: Verb Phrase, Automotive

  17. kick up, to drive or force upward by kicking. to stir up (trouble); make or cause (a disturbance, scene, etc.). (esp. of a machine part) to move rapidly upward:

    The lever kicks up, engaging the gear.

    Category: Verb Phrase

  18. (n.)the act of kicking; a blow or thrust with the foot, feet, leg, or legs.

  19. power or disposition to kick:

    a horse with a mean kick.

  20. an objection or complaint.

  21. thrill; pleasurable excitement. a strong but temporary interest, often an activity:

    Photography is her latest kick.

  22. a stimulating or intoxicating quality in alcoholic drink or certain drugs. vim, vigor, or energy.

  23. Football. an instance of kicking the ball. any method of kicking the ball: a kicked ball. the distance such a ball travels.

    a place kick.

    Category: Sport

  24. a recoil, as of a gun.

Idioms for kick:

  1. kick ass, Vulgar Slang. to act harshly or use force to gain a desired result. to beat; defeat. to be extraordinarily vigorous or successful. to be enjoyable or exciting.

    Category: Idiom, Status (usage)

  2. kick oneself,to reproach oneself:

    I could kick myself for forgetting her birthday.

    Category: Idiom

Origin of kick:

1350–1400; orig. uncert.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. kick, boot, kicking(noun)

    the act of delivering a blow with the foot

    "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent"

  2. bang, boot, charge, rush, flush, thrill, kick(noun)

    the swift release of a store of affective force

    "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks"

  3. recoil, kick(noun)

    the backward jerk of a gun when it is fired

  4. gripe, kick, beef, bitch, squawk(noun)

    informal terms for objecting

    "I have a gripe about the service here"

  5. kick(noun)

    the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs)

    "a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick"

  6. kick, kicking(verb)

    a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenics

    "the kick must be synchronized with the arm movements"; "the swimmer's kicking left a wake behind him"

  7. kick(verb)

    drive or propel with the foot

  8. kick(verb)

    thrash about or strike out with the feet

  9. kick(verb)

    strike with the foot

    "The boy kicked the dog"; "Kick the door down"

  10. kick(verb)

    kick a leg up

  11. kick back, recoil, kick(verb)

    spring back, as from a forceful thrust

    "The gun kicked back into my shoulder"

  12. kick, give up(verb)

    stop consuming

    "kick a habit"; "give up alcohol"

  13. kick(verb)

    make a goal

    "He kicked the extra point after touchdown"

  14. complain, kick, plain, sound off, quetch, kvetch(verb)

    express complaints, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness

    "My mother complains all day"; "She has a lot to kick about"

Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

  1. kick(verb)ˈɪk

    to hit with your foot

    He kicked the ball to his friend.; He had been kicked in the face.; Don't kick. You'll hurt someone.

  2. kickˈɪk

    to move your legs around forcefully

    The baby kicked in the bath water.

  3. kickˈɪk

    to give up

    I've been trying to kick the coffee habit.

  4. kickˈɪk

    to regret doing or not doing

    I could have kicked myself for being so insensitive.

  5. kick(noun)ˈɪk

    when you hit sth with your foot

    a nasty kick in the head

  6. kickˈɪk

    a sense of enjoyment and excitement

    They seem to get a kick out of tricking people.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Kick(verb)

    to strike, thrust, or hit violently with the foot; as, a horse kicks a groom; a man kicks a dog

  2. Kick(verb)

    to thrust out the foot or feet with violence; to strike out with the foot or feet, as in defense or in bad temper; esp., to strike backward, as a horse does, or to have a habit of doing so. Hence, figuratively: To show ugly resistance, opposition, or hostility; to spurn

  3. Kick(verb)

    to recoil; -- said of a musket, cannon, etc

  4. Kick(noun)

    a blow with the foot or feet; a striking or thrust with the foot

  5. Kick(noun)

    the projection on the tang of the blade of a pocket knife, which prevents the edge of the blade from striking the spring. See Illust. of Pocketknife

  6. Kick(noun)

    a projection in a mold, to form a depression in the surface of the brick

  7. Kick(noun)

    the recoil of a musket or other firearm, when discharged

Freebase

  1. Kick

    In combat sports and hand-to-hand combat, a kick is a physical strike using the foot, leg, or knee. This type of attack is used frequently, especially in stand-up fighting. Kicks play a significant role in many forms of martial arts, such as Taekwondo, Karate, Pankration, Kung fu, Vovinam, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, Capoeira, Silat, and Kalarippayattu. Kicks are also used for kicking objects such as balls, books etc. If a human uses a kick in sport, it would most likely be used for kicking an object into a goal such as kicking a soccer ball into a goal and so on.

The New Hacker's Dictionary

  1. kick

    1. [IRC] To cause somebody to be removed from a IRC channel, an option only available to channel ops. This is an extreme measure, often used to combat extreme flamage or flooding, but sometimes used at the CHOP's whim. 2. To reboot a machine or kill a running process. “The server's down, let me go kick it.”

British National Corpus

  1. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'KICK' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3029

  2. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'KICK' in Nouns Frequency: #2094

  3. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'KICK' in Verbs Frequency: #507


Translations for KICK

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

kick(noun)

a blow with the foot

The boy gave him a kick on the ankle; He was injured by a kick from a horse.

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