Definitions for GERMANYˈdʒɜr mə ni

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word GERMANY

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

Ger•ma•nyˈdʒɜr mə ni(n.)

  1. a republic in central Europe: after World War II divided into four zones, British, French, U.S., and Soviet, and in 1949 into East Germany and West Germany; East and West Germany were reunited in 1990. 83,087,361; 137,852 sq. mi. (357,039 sq. km). Cap.: Berlin.

    Category: Geography (places)

    Ref: Official name, Federal Republic of Germany.; German Deutschland.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Germany, Federal Republic of Germany, Deutschland, FRG(noun)

    a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990

Wiktionary

  1. Germany(ProperNoun)

    Country in Central Europe. Official name: Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland).

  2. Germany(ProperNoun)

    (countable; hist. 1949-1990) Either of the German states, FRG and GDR. The two Germanies exchanged permanent representatives in 1974.

  3. Germany(ProperNoun)

    (countable; hist. pre-1871) Any of the German states. Meltonu2019s useful new book traces the explosion of public institutions in eighteenth-century England, France and the Germanies.

  4. Origin: From Germania, likely of Gallic origin.

Freebase

  1. Germany

    Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a federal parliamentary republic in western-central Europe. The country consists of 16 states, and its capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 square kilometres and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. With 80.3 million inhabitants, it is the most populous member state in the European Union. Germany is the major economic and political power of the European continent and a historic leader in many theoretical and technical fields. A region named Germania, inhabited by several Germanic peoples, was documented before AD 100. During the Migration Period, the Germanic tribes expanded southward and established successor kingdoms throughout much of Europe. Beginning in the 10th century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman Empire. During the 16th century, northern German regions became the centre of the Protestant Reformation while southern and western parts remained dominated by Roman Catholic denominations, with the two factions clashing in the Thirty Years' War, marking the beginning of the Catholic–Protestant divide that has characterized German society ever since. Occupied during the Napoleonic Wars, the rise of Pan-Germanism inside the German Confederation resulted in the unification of most of the German states in 1871 into the German Empire, which was dominated by Prussia.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Germany

    constituted an empire in 1871, occupies a commanding position in Central Europe, and stretches from Switzerland in the S. to the German Ocean and Baltic Sea on the N.; Austria lies to the SE., Russia to the NE., while France, Belgium, and the Netherlands flank the W.; is made up of 26 States of widely varying size and importance, comprising four kingdoms (of which Prussia is by far the largest and most influential), six grand-duchies, five duchies, seven principalities, three free towns (Lübeck, Bremen, Hamburg), and one imperial province, Alsace-Lorraine; the main physical divisions are (1) the great lowland plain stretching from the centre to the Baltic and North Sea, well watered by the Ems, Weser, Elbe, Oder, Vistula, and their tributaries, in which, bating large sandy tracts, agriculture employs a large class, and cereals, tobacco, and beetroot are raised; (2) the mountainous district, in the interior of which the Fichtelgebirge is the central knot, in which vast forests abound, and rich deposits of coal, fire-clays, iron, and other metals are worked, giving rise to iron-works and potteries; (3) the basin of the Rhine, on the W., where the vine is largely cultivated, and extensive manufactures of silks, cottons, and hardware are carried on; fine porcelain comes from Saxony and vast quantities of beer from Bavaria; Westphalia is the centre of the steel and iron works; throughout Germany there are 26,000 m. of railway line (chiefly State railways), 57,000 m. of telegraph line, while excellent roads, canals, and navigable rivers facilitate communication; 65 per cent. of the people are Protestants; education is compulsory and more highly developed than in any other European country; the energies of the increasing population have in recent years found scope for their action in their growing colonial possessions; the military system imposes upon every German a term of seven years' service, three in active service, and the remainder in the reserve, and till his forty-sixth year he is liable to be called out on any great emergency; under the emperor the government is carried on by a Federal Council, the members of which are appointed by the governments of the various estates, and the Reichstag, elected by universal suffrage and ballot for three years.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'GERMANY' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #914

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'GERMANY' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1750

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