Definitions for Erosionɪˈroʊ ʒən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Erosion

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

e•ro•sionɪˈroʊ ʒən(n.)

  1. the act or process of eroding.

  2. the state of being eroded.

  3. the process by which the surface of the earth is worn away by the action of water, glaciers, winds, waves, etc.

    Category: Geology

Origin of erosion:

1535–45; < L ērōsiō. See erode , -tion

e•ro′sion•al(adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. erosion, eroding, eating away, wearing, wearing away(noun)

    (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)

  2. erosion(noun)

    condition in which the earth's surface is worn away by the action of water and wind

  3. erosion(noun)

    a gradual decline of something

    "after the accounting scandal there was an erosion of confidence in the auditors"

  4. corrosion, corroding, erosion(noun)

    erosion by chemical action

Wiktionary

  1. erosion(Noun)

    The result of having been being worn away or eroded, as by a glacier on rock or the sea on a cliff face

  2. erosion(Noun)

    The changing of a surface by mechanical action, friction, thermal expansion contraction, or impact.

  3. erosion(Noun)

    Destruction by abrasive action of fluids.

  4. erosion(Noun)

    One of two fundamental operations in morphological image processing from which all other morphological operations are derived.

  5. erosion(Noun)

    Loss of tooth enamel due to non-bacteriogenic chemical processes.

  6. erosion(Noun)

    A shallow ulceration or lesion, usually involving skin or epithelial tissue.

  7. Origin: From erosio, derived from erodere, possibly via erosionem and Middle French erosion.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Erosion(noun)

    the act or operation of eroding or eating away

  2. Erosion(noun)

    the state of being eaten away; corrosion; canker

Freebase

  1. Erosion

    Erosion is the process by which soil and rock are removed from the Earth's surface by exogenetic processes such as wind or water flow, and then transported and deposited in other locations. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10-40 times the rate at which erosion is occurring globally. Excessive erosion causes problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity due to land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, and ecological collapse due to loss of the nutrient rich upper soil layers. Water and wind erosion are now the two primary causes of land degradation; combined, they are responsible for 84% of degraded acreage, making excessive erosion one of the most significant global environmental problems. Industrial agriculture, deforestation, roads, anthropogenic climate change and urban sprawl are amongst the most significant human activities in regard to their effect on stimulating erosion. However, there are many available alternative land use practices that can curtail or limit erosion, such as terrace-building, no-till agriculture, and revegetation of denuded soils.

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Erosion' in Nouns Frequency: #2579


Translations for Erosion

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

erosion(noun)

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