Definitions for Enclosureɛnˈkloʊ ʒər

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Enclosure

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

en•clo•sureɛnˈkloʊ ʒər(n.)

  1. something that encloses, as a fence or wall.

  2. an enclosed area, esp. a tract of land surrounded by a fence.

  3. something enclosed or included, as within a letter.

  4. an act or instance of enclosing; the state of being enclosed.

Origin of enclosure:

1530–40

Princeton's WordNet

  1. enclosure(noun)

    a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose

  2. enclosure, enclosing, envelopment, inclosure(noun)

    the act of enclosing something inside something else

  3. enclosure, natural enclosure(noun)

    a naturally enclosed space

  4. enclosure, inclosure(noun)

    something (usually a supporting document) that is enclosed in an envelope with a covering letter

Wiktionary

  1. enclosure(Noun)

    Something enclosed, i.e. inserted into a letter or similar package.

    There was an enclosure with the letter u2014 a photo.

  2. enclosure(Noun)

    The act of enclosing, i.e. the insertion or inclusion of an item in a letter or package.

    There was an enclosure with the letter u2014 a photo.

  3. enclosure(Noun)

    An area, domain, or amount of something partially or entirely enclosed by barriers.

  4. enclosure(Noun)

    The act of separating and surrounding an area, domain, or amount of something with a barrier.

  5. enclosure(Noun)

    The post-feudal process of subdivision of common lands for individual ownership.

    Strip-farming disappeared after enclosure.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Enclosure(noun)

    inclosure. See Inclosure

Freebase

  1. Enclosure

    In English social and economic history, enclosure or inclosure is the process which ends traditional rights such as mowing meadows for hay, or grazing livestock on common land formerly held in the open field system. Once enclosed, these uses of the land become restricted to the owner, and it ceases to be land for commons. In England and Wales the term is also used for the process that ended the ancient system of arable farming in open fields. Under enclosure, such land is fenced and deeded or entitled to one or more owners. The process of enclosure began to be a widespread feature of the English agricultural landscape during the 16th century. By the 19th century, unenclosed commons had become largely restricted to rough pasture in mountainous areas and to relatively small parts of the lowlands. The process of enclosure has sometimes been accompanied by force, resistance, and bloodshed, and remains among the most controversial areas of agricultural and economic history in England. Marxist and neo-Marxist historians argue that rich landowners used their control of state processes to appropriate public land for their private benefit. This created a landless working class that provided the labour required in the new industries developing in the north of England. For example: "In agriculture the years between 1760 and 1820 are the years of wholesale enclosure in which, in village after village, common rights are lost". "Enclosure was a plain enough case of class robbery".


Translations for Enclosure

Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary

enclosure(noun)

the act of enclosing.

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