Definitions for ELLɛl

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word ELL

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

ellɛl(n.)

or el 1 2

  1. an extension usu. at right angles to one end of a building or room.

    Category: Architecture

  2. Ref: elbow (def. 4). 5

Origin of ell:

1765–75; a sp. of the letter name, or by shortening of elbow

ellɛl(n.)

  1. a former measure of length, varying in different countries: in England equal to 45 inches (114 cm).

    Category: Weights and Measures

Origin of ell:

bef. 950; ME, OE eln; c. ON eln, OHG elina, Go aleina, L ulna forearm, Gk ōlénē. Cf. elbow

Princeton's WordNet

  1. ell(noun)

    an extension at the end and at right angles to the main building

Wiktionary

  1. ell(Noun)

    A measure for cloth. An English ell equals 1.25 yards, whereas a Scottish ell measures only 1.0335 yards (http://www.onlineunitconversion.com). A Flemish ell measured three quarters, (27 inches).

  2. ell(Noun)

    An extension usually at right angles to one end of a building.

  3. ell(Noun)

    Something that is L-shaped.

  4. ELL(Noun)

    A protein found in a Cajal body.

  5. Origin: From eln “unit of measure of 45 inches,” originally “length of the forearm,” from Proto-Indo-European *el- “elbow, forearm”.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Ell(noun)

    a measure for cloth; -- now rarely used. It is of different lengths in different countries; the English ell being 45 inches, the Dutch or Flemish ell 27, the Scotch about 37

  2. Ell(noun)

    see L

Freebase

  1. Ell

    An ell is a unit of measurement, originally a cubit, i.e., approximating the length of a man's arm from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger, or about 18 inches; in later usage, any of several longer units. In English-speaking countries, these included the Flemish ell, English ell and French ell, some of which are thought to derive from a 'double ell'. Several national forms existed, with different lengths, including the Scottish ell, the Flemish ell, the French ell the Polish ell and the Danish ell Select customs were observed by English importers of Dutch textiles: although all cloths were bought by the Flemish ell, linen was sold by the English ell, but tapestry was sold by the Flemish ell. In England, the ell was usually 45 in, or a yard and a quarter. It was mainly used in the tailoring business but is now obsolete. Although the exact length was never defined in English law, standards were kept; the brass ell examined at the Exchequer by Graham in the 1740s had been in use "since the time of Queen Elizabeth".

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