Definitions for Diffractiondɪˈfræk ʃən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Diffraction

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

dif•frac•tiondɪˈfræk ʃən(n.)

  1. a modulation of waves in response to an obstacle, as an object, slit, or grating, in the path of propagation, giving rise in light waves to a banded pattern or to a spectrum.

    Category: Physics

Origin of diffraction:

1665–75; < NL diffrāctiō, der. of L diffringere to break up

Princeton's WordNet

  1. diffraction(noun)

    when light passes sharp edges or goes through narrow slits the rays are deflected and produce fringes of light and dark bands

Wiktionary

  1. diffraction(Noun)

    The breaking up of an electromagnetic wave as it passes a geometric structure (e.g. a slit), followed by reconstruction of the wave by interference.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Diffraction(noun)

    the deflection and decomposition of light in passing by the edges of opaque bodies or through narrow slits, causing the appearance of parallel bands or fringes of prismatic colors, as by the action of a grating of fine lines or bars

Freebase

  1. Diffraction

    Diffraction refers to various phenomena which occur when a wave encounters an obstacle. In classical physics, the diffraction phenomenon is described as the apparent bending of waves around small obstacles and the spreading out of waves past small openings. Similar effects occur when a light wave travels through a medium with a varying refractive index, or a sound wave travels through one with varying acoustic impedance. Diffraction occurs with all waves, including sound waves, water waves, and electromagnetic waves such as visible light, X-rays and radio waves. As physical objects have wave-like properties, diffraction also occurs with matter and can be studied according to the principles of quantum mechanics. Italian scientist Francesco Maria Grimaldi coined the word "diffraction" and was the first to record accurate observations of the phenomenon in 1665. Richard Feynman wrote: He suggested that when there are only a few sources, say two, we call it interference, as in Young's slits, but with a large number of sources, the process be labelled diffraction. While diffraction occurs whenever propagating waves encounter such changes, its effects are generally most pronounced for waves whose wavelength is roughly similar to the dimensions of the diffracting objects. If the obstructing object provides multiple, closely spaced openings, a complex pattern of varying intensity can result. This is due to the superposition, or interference, of different parts of a wave that travels to the observer by different paths.

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