Definitions for Cyberneticsˌsaɪ bərˈnɛt ɪks

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Cybernetics

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

cy•ber•net•ics*ˌsaɪ bərˈnɛt ɪks(n.)

  1. the comparative study of organic control and communication systems, as the brain and its neurons, and mechanical or electronic systems analogous to them, as robots or computers.

    Category: Computers

* (used with a sing. v.).

Origin of cybernetics:

1948; < Gk kybernḗt(ēs) helmsman, steersman (kybernē-, var. s. of kybernân to steer +-tēs agent suffix) + -ics

cy`ber•net′i•cist-nɪˈtɪʃ ən(n.)

cy`ber•ne•ti′cian-nɪˈtɪʃ ən(n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. cybernetics(noun)

    (biology) the field of science concerned with processes of communication and control (especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems)

Wiktionary

  1. cybernetics(Noun)

    The theory/science of communication and control in the animal and the machine.

  2. cybernetics(Noun)

    The art/study of governing, controlling automatic processes and communication.

  3. cybernetics(Noun)

    Technology related to computers and Internet.

  4. Origin: From κυβερνητικός, from κυβερνάω, possibly based on 1830s French cybernétique "the art of governing." The term was coined in 1948 by U.S. mathematician Norbert Wiener.

Freebase

  1. Cybernetics

    Cybernetics is a transdisciplinary approach for exploring regulatory systems, their structures, constraints, and possibilities. Cybernetics is relevant to the study of systems, such as mechanical, physical, biological, cognitive, and social systems. Cybernetics is applicable when a system being analyzed is involved in a closed signaling loop; that is, where action by the system generates some change in its environment and that change is reflected in that system in some manner that triggers a system change, originally referred to as a "circular causal" relationship. Some say this is necessary to a cybernetic perspective. System dynamics, a related field, originated with applications of electrical engineering control theory to other kinds of simulation models by Jay Forrester at MIT in the 1950s. Concepts studied by cyberneticists include, but are not limited to: learning, cognition, adaption, social control, emergence, communication, efficiency, efficacy, and connectivity. These concepts are studied by other subjects such as engineering and biology, but in cybernetics these are abstracted from the context of the individual organism or device.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Cybernetics

    That branch of learning which brings together theories and studies on communication and control in living organisms and machines.

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