Definitions for Constrictionkənˈstrɪk ʃən

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Constriction

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

con•stric•tionkənˈstrɪk ʃən(n.)

  1. the act of constricting.

  2. the state of being constricted; tightness or inward pressure.

  3. a constricted part.

  4. something that constricts.

Origin of constriction:

1350–1400; ME < LL

Princeton's WordNet

  1. constriction, bottleneck, chokepoint(noun)

    a narrowing that reduces the flow through a channel

  2. constriction, coarctation(noun)

    tight or narrow compression

  3. constriction, tightness(noun)

    a tight feeling in some part of the body

    "he felt a constriction in her chest"; "she felt an alarming tightness in her chest"; "emotion caused a constriction of his throat"

  4. constriction(noun)

    the action or process of compressing

Wiktionary

  1. constriction(Noun)

    The act of constricting, the state of being constricted, or something that constricts

  2. constriction(Noun)

    A narrow part of something; a stricture

  3. constriction(Noun)

    A compression

Webster Dictionary

  1. Constriction(noun)

    the act of constricting by means of some inherent power or by movement or change in the thing itself, as distinguished from compression

  2. Constriction(noun)

    the state of being constricted; the point where a thing is constricted; a narrowing or binding

Freebase

  1. Constriction

    Constriction is a method used by various snake species to kill their prey. Although some species of venomous and mildly venomous snakes do use constriction to subdue their prey, most snakes which use constriction lack venom. The snake initially strikes at its prey and holds on, pulling the prey into its coils or, in the case of very large prey, pulling itself onto the prey. The snake will then wrap one or two coils around the prey. Contrary to myth, the snake does not crush the prey, or even break its bones. Traditionally, it has been thought that snakes hold tightly enough to prevent the prey from drawing air into its lungs, resulting in death from asphyxia. However, some prey items seem to die faster than would be possible through asphyxia, so it has also been suggested that the pressure of constriction causes a rise in the pressure in the prey's body cavity greater than the heart can counter, resulting in immediate cardiac arrest. This new hypothesis has yet to be confirmed, but data indicates that snakes can exert enough pressure for this mechanism to be plausible. Research into this topic is ongoing. It has been found that the green anaconda has a constriction strength of 6 kg/cm², which effectively means a total strength of 4000 kg.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Constriction

    The act of constricting.

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