Definitions for Bromineˈbroʊ min, -mɪn

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Bromine

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

bro•mineˈbroʊ min, -mɪn(n.)

  1. a dark reddish, fuming, toxic liquid element obtained from natural brines and ocean water and used chiefly in gasoline antiknock compounds, pharmaceuticals, and dyes.

    Category: Chemistry

    Ref: Symbol: Br; 2

Origin of bromine:

1827; < F brome bromine (< Gk brômos stench) + -ine2

Princeton's WordNet

  1. bromine, Br, atomic number 35(noun)

    a nonmetallic heavy volatile corrosive dark brown liquid element belonging to the halogens; found in sea water

Wiktionary

  1. bromine(Noun)

    A nonmetallic chemical element (symbol Br) with an atomic number of 35; one of the halogens

  2. bromine(Noun)

    A bromine atom in a molecule

  3. Origin: From brome, from βρῶμος

Webster Dictionary

  1. Bromine(noun)

    one of the elements, related in its chemical qualities to chlorine and iodine. Atomic weight 79.8. Symbol Br. It is a deep reddish brown liquid of a very disagreeable odor, emitting a brownish vapor at the ordinary temperature. In combination it is found in minute quantities in sea water, and in many saline springs. It occurs also in the mineral bromyrite

Freebase

  1. Bromine

    Bromine is a chemical element with the symbol Br, and atomic number of 35. It is in the halogen group. The element was isolated independently by two chemists, Carl Jacob Löwig and Antoine Jerome Balard, in 1825–1826. Elemental bromine is a fuming red-brown liquid at room temperature, corrosive and toxic, with properties between those of chlorine and iodine. Free bromine does not occur in nature, but occurs as colorless soluble crystalline mineral halide salts, analogous to table salt. Bromine is rarer than about three-quarters of elements in the Earth's crust; however, the high solubility of bromide ion has caused its accumulation in the oceans, and commercially the element is easily extracted from brine pools, mostly in the United States, Israel and China. About 556,000 tonnes were produced in 2007, an amount similar to the far more abundant element magnesium. At high temperatures, organobromine compounds readily convert to free bromine atoms, a process which has the effect of stopping free radical chemical chain reactions. This effect makes organobromine compounds useful as fire retardants; more than half the bromine produced industrially worldwide each year is put to this use. Unfortunately, the same property causes sunlight to convert volatile organobromine compounds to free bromine atoms in the atmosphere, and an unwanted side effect of this process is ozone depletion. As a result, many organobromide compounds that were formerly in common use—such as the pesticide methyl bromide—have been abandoned. Bromine compounds are still used for certain purposes, however, including in well-drilling fluids, in film photography, and as an intermediate in the manufacture of organic chemicals.–

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Bromine

    an elementary fluid of a dark colour and a disagreeable smell, extracted from bittern, a liquid which remains after the separation of salt.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Bromine

    A halogen with the atomic symbol Br, atomic number 36, and atomic weight 79.904. It is a volatile reddish-brown liquid that gives off suffocating vapors, is corrosive to the skin, and may cause severe gastroenteritis if ingested.

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