Definitions for Aphasiaəˈfeɪ ʒə

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Aphasia

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

a•pha•siaəˈfeɪ ʒə(n.)

  1. the loss of a previously held ability to speak or understand spoken or written language, due to disease or injury of the brain.

    Category: Pathology

Origin of aphasia:

1865–70; < Gk: speechlessness =a-a -6+phat(ós) spoken, v. adj. of phánai to speak +-ia -ia

a•pha′sic(adj.; n.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. aphasia(noun)

    inability to use or understand language (spoken or written) because of a brain lesion

Wiktionary

  1. aphasia(Noun)

    A partial or total loss of language skills due to brain damage. Usually, damage to the left perisylvian region, including Broca's area and Wernike's area, causes aphasia.

  2. Origin: Modern Latin, from ἀφασία, from ἄφατος, from ἀ- + φάσις.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Aphasia(noun)

    alt. of Aphasy

Freebase

  1. Aphasia

    Aphasia is a disturbance of the comprehension and formulation of language caused by dysfunction in specific brain regions. This class of language disorder ranges from having difficulty remembering words to losing the ability to speak, read, or write. This also affects visual language such as sign language. Aphasia is usually linked to brain damage, most commonly by stroke. Brain damage linked to aphasia can also cause further brain diseases such as cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease. Acute aphasia disorders usually develop quickly as a result of head injury or stroke, and progressive forms of aphasia develop slowly from a brain tumor, infection, or dementia. The area and extent of brain damage or atrophy will determine the type of aphasia and its symptoms. Aphasia types include expressive aphasia, receptive aphasia, conduction aphasia, anomic aphasia, global aphasia, primary progressive aphasias and many others. Medical evaluations for the disorder range from clinical screenings by a neurologist to extensive tests by a Speech-Language Pathologist. Most acute aphasia patients can recover some or most skills by working with a Speech-Language Pathologist. This rehabilitation can take two or more years and is most effective when begun quickly. Only a small minority will recover without therapy, such as those suffering a mini-stroke. Improvement varies widely, depending on the aphasia's cause, type, and severity. Recovery also depends on the patient's age, health, motivation, handedness, and educational level.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Aphasia

    A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.


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