Definitions for Antiochˈæn tiˌɒk

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Antioch

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

An•ti•ochˈæn tiˌɒk(n.)

  1. Category: Ancient History, Geography (places)

    Ref: Arabic, Antakiya.; Turkish, Antakya.

  2. a city in W California. 55,980.

    Category: Geography (places)

An•ti•o•chi•anˌæn tiˈoʊ ki ən(n.; adj.)

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Antioch, Antakya, Antakiya(noun)

    a town in southern Turkey; ancient commercial center and capital of Syria; an early center of Christianity

Wiktionary

  1. Antioch(ProperNoun)

    the name of a number of cities founded by kings of the Seleucid dynasty, the most famous being "Antioch on the Orontes" in ancient Syria (modern day Antakya in south-eastern Turkey)

  2. Origin: From Ἀντιόχεια, from Ἀντίοχος. This was the given name of the Macedonian father of Seleucus I Nicator, the founder of the Seleucid Empire. Subsequently the name was borne by various kings of Seleucid dynasty and numerous cities in their domain are named after these personages. Compare also Laodicea and Apamea.

Freebase

  1. Antioch

    Antioch on the Orontes was an ancient city on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. As a result of its longevity and the pivotal role it played in the emergence of both Hellenistic Judaism and Early Christianity, Antioch was called "the cradle of Christianity." It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of repeated earthquakes, the Crusaders' invasions, and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.

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