Definitions for Acadiaəˈkeɪ di ə

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Acadia

Random House Webster's College Dictionary

A•ca•di•aəˈkeɪ di ə(n.)

  1. a region and former French colony on the N Atlantic coast of North America, including the present Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, and part of Maine: ceded to the British 1713.

    Category: Geography (places), Western History

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Acadia(noun)

    the French-speaking part of the Canadian Maritime Provinces

Wiktionary

  1. Acadia(ProperNoun)

    A colonial territory owned by France in the 17th and early 18th centuries, spanning over what is now northeast USA and the Maritime provinces of eastern Canada (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland)

  2. Acadia(ProperNoun)

    Acadia National Park, a national park in Maine

  3. Acadia(ProperNoun)

    A parish in southern Louisiana settled by Acadian exiles.

  4. Origin: From Archadia (1520), possibly from Ἀρκαδία, or possibly from akadie.

Freebase

  1. Acadia

    Acadia was a colony of New France in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day Maine to the Kennebec River. During much of the 17th and early 18th centuries, Norridgewock on the Kennebec River and Castine at the end of the Penobscot River were the southern-most settlements of Acadia. The actual specification by the French government for the territory refers to lands bordering the Atlantic coast, roughly between the 40th and 46th parallels. Later, the territory was divided into the British colonies which became Canadian provinces and American states. The population of Acadia included descendants of emigrants from France along with those from the Wabanaki Confederacy. The two communities inter-married, which resulted in a significant portion of the population of Acadia being Métis. The first capital of Acadia, established in 1605, was Port-Royal. A British force from Virginia attacked and burned down the town in 1613 but it was later rebuilt nearby, where it remained the longest serving capital of French Acadia until the British conquest of Acadia in 1710. Over seventy-four years there were six colonial wars, in which English and later British interests tried to capture Acadia starting with King William's War in 1689. During these wars, along with some French troops from Quebec, some Acadians, the Wabanaki Confederacy, and French priests continuously raided New England settlements along the border in Maine. While Acadia was officially conquered in 1710 during Queen Anne's War, present-day New Brunswick and much of Maine remained contested territory. Present-day Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton were conceded by Britain to France and renamed Île Saint-Jean and Île Royale. By militarily defeating the Wabanaki Confederacy and the French priests, present-day Maine fell during Father Rale's War. During King George's War, France and New France made significant attempts to regain mainland Nova Scotia. After Father Le Loutre's War, present-day New Brunswick fell to the British. Finally, during the French and Indian War, both Île Royale and Île Saint-Jean fell to the British in 1758.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Acadia

    the French name for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

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